The Population Geography Research Group (PGRG) provides a forum for population geographers to present and discuss the latest findings of research in the sub-discipline through its conference and publication activities, to debate relevant theoretical, philosophical and methodological issues, and to consider policy dimensions, both in the UK and internationally.

Postdoc / Research Positions in the GeoHealth Lab at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, NZ

By John McCarthy - Last updated: Friday, January 23, 2015

Please see the following links for details:

Geospatial Data Scientist – Sensing City Health Project
http://www.seek.co.nz/job/27987857

Postdoctoral Fellow – GeoHealth Laboratory
http://www.seek.co.nz/job/27987858

Filed in Announcements/ News, Jobs

Postdoctoral Research Associate – Quantitative Population Geography

By John McCarthy - Last updated: Wednesday, January 14, 2015

 
There is a research associate opportunity in quantitative population geography at the University of Liverpool. The post details are as follows:
 
Postdoctoral Research Associate
£32,277 pa
Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Environmental Sciences, Department of Geography and Planning
Location: University Campus
Ref: R-587244/WWW
 
Closing date for receipt of applications: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 17:00:00 GMT
 
This exciting opportunity arises from a recent ESRC Secondary Data Analysis Initiative Phase 2 award, to support a project which focuses on geographic inequalities in the UK and how these have changed over the last 40 years. The project will involve the development of a set of population surfaces for a wide array of socio-economic and demographic variables for the UK Censuses of 1971-2011. These population surfaces enable assessment of changes over small geographical areas. The production of surfaces will allow detailed analysis of, for example, the persistence of social deprivation at the neighbourhood scale or the ways in which housing tenures have changed across the regions of the UK. You should have a PhD in Population Geography, Geographic Information Science, or the broader Social Sciences (with a quantitative focus). Experience in manipulating large datasets and some programming experience would also be desirable. The post is available until 31 July 2016.
 
For more information, please see: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AKG036/postdoctoral-research-associate/

Filed in Announcements/ News, Jobs

Call for Papers: Annual Conference of the 2015 RGS-IBG

By John McCarthy - Last updated: Tuesday, January 13, 2015

 

The Population Geography Research Group are delighted to issue our call for papers for the annual conference of the 2015 RGS-IBG, for sessions sponsored by the research group. The conference will take place on Wednesday 2nd to Friday 4th September 2015, at the University of Exeter.

 

If you are interested in presenting a paper in one of these sessions, please email a paper abstract of 200-300 words to the session convenor(s) listed underneath the session titles below. Abstracts must be with session convenors no later than Wednesday 11th February.

 

1. Exploiting New Data for Population Research

 

Co-sponsored by the Quantitative Methods Research Group

 

Convenors: Adam Dennett (University College London), Ian Shuttleworth (Queen’s University Belfast), Nik Lomax (University of Leeds) and Chris Lloyd (University of Liverpool)
Email contact: a.dennett@ucl.ac.uk

 

Researchers studying population have long relied on the rich and familiar data contained in national population censuses. However, as the popularity of censuses worldwide is challenged by the ‘data deluge’ and the prospect of free (or at least by-product), real-time (or at least more-timely) and ‘Big’ new datasets, what does this ‘brave new world’ offer population geographers? There is potential to ask and answer new questions but also significant theoretical and methodological challenges in handling and extracting meaning from these proliferating new datasets. The session aims to explore not only these new social and policy questions but also the methods that can be most appropriately used. Scholarly papers are therefore invited from those interested in using these new data to understand human population patterns and processes, particularly (but not exclusively) in the areas of:

 

Population dynamics and/or estimation
Migration
Geo-demographics
Planning and Policy
Health and epidemiology
Cities and urban sustainability
Crime and Security
Spatial Modelling and GIS

 

2. Getting My Research Funded: A Workshop for Population Geographers

 

Co-sponsored by the Postgraduate Forum

 

Convenors: Nik Lomax (University of Leeds), Keith Halfacree (Swansea University) and Nigel De Noronha (University of Manchester)
Email contact: n.m.lomax@leeds.ac.uk

 

Attracting research funding is an essential skill for all academics: grant income dictates the quality and scope of work which can be undertaken and is a key contributor to successful progression through an academic career. This session provides an opportunity for discussion of the wide range of funding streams (both UK and international) available to population geographers and will provide advice on how to seek out and apply for this funding. Participants are asked to provide an overview of their research (which could be a shortened version of a presentation given for another session at the conference). A group discussion will follow which focuses on the types of funding which are directly relevant to population geographers. This discussion involves both the presenters and the audience. The focus on relevant funding provides participants with an opportunity to gather advice from experienced academics, who will share their tips on successfully applying for grants and other research income.
The session is aimed at postgraduates and early career researchers with an interest in population geography, but is of course open to anyone with an interest in learning more about identifying and applying for research funding.

 

3. Exploring the Migration Industries

 

Convenor: Sophie Cranston (Loughborough University)
Email contact: S.Cranston@lboro.ac.uk

 

In this ‘age of migration’ (Castles and Millar 2009) research on migration tends to focus on why migrants leave home and what happens to them when they arrive. However, two recent developments in studies of migration challenge this conceptualisation. First, from a mobilities perspective we challenge such sedendarist understandings and see migration as being like a journey where we explore how migrant identity is produced on the move (Cresswell 2006). Second, from a more structuralist approach, we have begun to explore the commercialisation of migration— how migration is mediated by businesses as diverse as brokers, security companies, transporters, non-governmental organisations, recruitment agencies and international human resource management (Gammeltoft-Hansen and Sorenson 2013). We can see research on the migration industries as looking at the provision of services that facilitate, constrain and assist international migration, the central role that industries play in shaping and constraining contemporary mobility patterns and mobile identities.

 

This session is aimed at those wishing to present research that advances our understanding of the operation of the migration industries from a variety of perspectives. This could include research that looks at:

 

• Theoretical perspectives on migration industries;
• Empirical examples of migration industries;
• Explanations between different types of migration industries;
• The relationship between the state and migration industries;
• How migration industries mediate patterns of mobility;
• How migration industries shape experiences of mobility.

 

References:
Castles, S., and M. J. Miller. 2009. The age of migration : international population movements in the modern world. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
Cresswell, T. 2006. On the move: Mobility in Modern Western World. New York; London: Taylor Francis Group.
Gammeltoft-Hansen, T. and N. Nyberg Sorenson. Eds. 2013. The Migration Industry and the Commercialization of International Migration. London: Routledge

 

4. Mobilities and Immobilities in Europe after the Global Economic Crisis

 

Convenors: Darja Reuschke and David McCollum (University of St Andrews)
Email contact: darja.reuschke@st-andrews.ac.uk

 

Population geographers and sociologists have paid much attention to immigration and work-related mobilities of highly skilled people. This research has drawn the picture of highly mobile societies and ever-increasing mobility demands put in place in the work sphere. Little attention has been paid to immobility and immobile groups including the sick and disabled, single parents and other households on low incomes. Some commentators have argued (before the crisis) that this mobility dialectic does not match the reality of the vast majority of the population. How has the Global Economic Crisis impacted on mobility and immobility in Europe? Have high unemployment rates and under-employment in most of European countries decreased internal migration? How have immigration patterns in Europe been developed over the past years and who is mobile and who is not? Have we reached ‘peak mobility’ on the grounds of little employment opportunities elsewhere?
This session seeks answers to this set of questions to understand contemporary living and work choices of people and households in Europe. It particularly seeks to shift the focus on spatial immobility and resources (e.g. in the neighbourhood) that have helped people and households to cope with the slacked economic situation in place. We are also particularly interested in papers that expand the ‘job’ focus of existing population and employment research through looking at people becoming self-employed in situ or the informal economy.

 

Filed in Announcements/ News, Conferences, Events

Call for papers – International Conference on Population Geographies 2015

By John McCarthy - Last updated: Wednesday, December 17, 2014

 

The Spatial Dimensions of Population – Call for papers

 

The call for papers for the 8th International Conference on Population Geographies is now open. The Conference will be held at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia from 30th June to 3rd July 2015.

 

Abstracts for papers and posters should be around 250 words and include the title, authors, affiliations, and contact email, and be sent to icpg2015@uq.edu.au. The conference organisers welcome offers of papers on any aspect of population geography or spatial demography, as well as proposals to organise sessions. The deadline for submissions is Monday 16th   February 2015.

 

Essential details of the conference including themed sessions, conference location, accommodation, and travel are available on the conference website at: http://www. icpg2015.org.

Filed in Conferences, Events

Joanna Stillwell Undergraduate Dissertation Prize 2014

By John McCarthy - Last updated: Sunday, November 16, 2014

 

Joanna Stillwell Undergraduate Dissertation Prize 2014

The Population Geography Research Group is proud to announce the winners of the Joanna Stillwell Undergraduate Dissertation Prize, 2014.

This prize is named in memory of Joanna Stillwell, daughter of Professor John Stillwell of the University of Leeds. The Population Geography Research Group awards three prizes (£100 for first prize; £50 for second prize; £25 for third prize) for the best undergraduate dissertations in the broad field of Population Geography. For further information (including past winners) please see: http://popgeog.org/prizes/.

The winners of the 2014 Joanna Stillwell Undergraduate Dissertation Prizes are:

Congratulations to James, Caitlin and Alicja!

Filed in Announcements/ News

Post Doctoral Fellow: GeoHealth Laboratory, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand

By John McCarthy - Last updated: Sunday, November 2, 2014

 

Post Doctoral Fellow: GeoHealth Laboratory, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

Job ID: 2386

 

Closing date: November 27th 2014

 

Research in Quantitative Health Geography

 

The GeoHealth Laboratory, Department of Geography, University of Canterbury invites applications for a postdoctoral fellowship (research). This is a three-year position and available immediately. The fellowship is intended for a recent Ph.D. whose training and research is in health and medical geography, public health, social epidemiology and/or related a discipline. Good quantitative skills and GIS expertise are essential. The successful candidate will be expected to develop research that is consistent with the research profile of the GeoHealth Laboratory. Potential research areas could include (but are not limited to):

 

· Neighbourhoods and health
· Environmental justice and health
· Environment and health
· Impacts of urban environment on health
· Transport and health
· Health inequalities

 

For more information about the GeoHealth Lab see: www.geohealth.canterbury.ac.nz/. Enquiries of an academic nature may be made to Prof Simon Kingham (simon.kingham@canterbury.ac.nz) or Dr Malcolm Campbell (malcolm.campbell@canterbury.ac.nz).

 

For further information and to apply online visit please visit http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/joinus/

 

An advert for the role can be accessed here. Download the full Position Description here.

 

Filed in Announcements/ News, Jobs

Eighth International Conference on Population Geographies Brisbane, Australia, 30 June 2015 to 3 July 2015

By John McCarthy - Last updated: Friday, October 31, 2014

Dear All,

We are delighted to announce that the 8th International Conference on Population Geographies will be held at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, from 30 June to 3 July 2015.

Essential details of the conference are available on the University of Queensland website at: http://www.gpem.uq.edu.au/icpg2015. As you will see, we expect to launch the full conference website, with more details, in mid November with the call for abstracts at the start of December.

The ICPG is unique! The previous conference in Groningen was a great success, and with your help we hope to create an equally stimulating and enjoyable event in Brisbane in mid 2015.

We expect to do a more general mail-out to potential participants within the next month. In the meantime, please feel free to publicise the Brisbane ICPG 2015, as widely as possible, and contact us if you have any queries.

We hope to welcome you to Brisbane in June next year.

Very best wishes

Martin Bell

on behalf of the ICPG2015 Organising Committee

Filed in Announcements/ News, Conferences, Events

‘Myths of Migration: The Changing British Population’ at the British Academy, London, on Monday 17 November 2014

By John McCarthy - Last updated: Tuesday, October 14, 2014

An evening meeting organised jointly by the British Academy and BSPS on ‘Myths of Migration: The Changing British Population’, at the British Academy, 10-11 Carlton House Terrace, London, on Monday 17 November 2014 at 6.00-7.30pm.

As part of its celebrations of the 25th anniversary of the publication of The Changing Population of Britain (edited by Heather Joshi), the BSPS has teamed up with the British Academy for an evening meeting on UK migration. This will describe trends over time in both international and internal migration and discuss how these patterns are changing the size and composition of our national and local populations (click here for more information). The meeting is free of charge, but pre-registration is required and seats are allocated on a first come, first served basis. To register, please go to the following webpage: http://www.britac.ac.uk/events/2014/MythsofMigration.cfm

Filed in Announcements/ News, Events

A BSPS day meeting on ‘usual residence’ and alternative population bases, at LSE on Friday 24th October 2014

By John McCarthy - Last updated: Tuesday, October 14, 2014
A BSPS day meeting on ‘usual residence’ and alternative population bases, at London School of Economics on Friday 24th October 2014, 10.30am-5.00pm.
 
A reminder that this meeting on population bases for presenting census and related stats will take place at LSE on Friday 24 October, 10.30am-5pm. The programme for the day is now finalised. Register by emailing pic@lse.ac.uk or phoning the BSPS Secretariat on 020 7955 7666. There is no charge for this meeting and it is open to members and non-members.
Filed in Announcements/ News, Events

RGS-IBG Annual Conference, 2014: Learning from the 2011 Census

By John McCarthy - Last updated: Wednesday, September 17, 2014

 

Learning from the 2011 Census: Sessions (1) through (4), Wed 27 August 2014

 

The following presentations were delivered at the RGS-IBG Annual Conference 2014, sessions ‘Learning from the 2011 Census’. Presentations are listed in session order.

 

Learning from the 2011 Census (1): Data Delivery and Characteristics

Justin Hayes and Rob Dymond-Green – New and easier ways of working with aggregate data and geographies from UK censuses

Cecilia Macintyre – Scotland’s Census 2011

Oliver Duke-Williams and John Stillwell – Census interaction data and access arrangements

Paul Waruszynski – Microdata products from the 2011 Census

Nicola Shelton, Ian Shuttleworth, Christopher Dibben and Fiona Cox – Longitudinal data in the UK Censuses

 

Learning from the 2011 Census (2): Changing Populations, Changing Geographies

Nigel Walford – Then and now: Micro-scale population change in parts of London, 1901-11 and 2001-11

Darren Smith – Changing geographies of traditionality and non-traditionality: Findings from the census

Thomas Murphy, John Stillwell and Lisa Buckner – Commuting to work in 2001 and 2011 in England and Wales: Analyses of national trends using aggregate and interaction data from the Census

 

Learning from the 2011 Census (3): Ethnicity, Health and Migration (part one)

Giles Barrett and David McEvoy – Age and ethnic spatial exposure

Nissa Finney and Ludi Simpson – ‘White flight’? What 2011 census data tell us about local ethnic group population change

Fran Darlington, Paul Norman and Dimitris Ballas – Exploring the inter-relationships between ethnicity, health, socioeconomic factors and internal migration: Evidence from the Samples of Anonymised Records in England

Stephen Clark, Mark Birkin, Phil Rees, Alison Heppenstall and Kirk Harland – Using 2011 Census data to estimate future elderly health care

 

Learning from the 2011 Census (4): Ethnicity, Health and migration (part two)

Phil Rees and Nik Lomax – Using the 2011 Census to fix ethnic group estimates and components for the prior decade

Nik Lomax, Phil Rees, John Stillwell and Paul Norman – Assessing internal migration patterns in the UK: A once in a decade opportunity

Myles Gould and Ian Shuttleworth – Health, housing tenure, and entrapment 2001-2011: Does changing tenure and address improve health?

Filed in Conferences